Install Bathroom Vanity Units With Sink

Install Bathroom Vanity Units With Sink

One of the best ways to make a big change in the look of your old bathrooms is to bathroom vanity units with sink. While installing a new vanity isn’t the easiest do-it-yourself project to undertake. it can be one of the most rewarding. At the end, you have a whole new area that is not only functional but livens up the bathroom decor.

Removing the old sink and cabinetry is the first step, of course. As always, turn off any water valves and open the tap to get as much out of the pipes as possible before disconnecting the hoses and pipes.

One literal sticking point is that most will be attached to the wall not only by easy-to-remove screws, but by caulk as well. That requires a patient, but necessary, slow chipping away with a utility knife until the sink is free of the wall and/or floor. The alternative is to simply rip it out, creating a much larger refinishing job at the end.

Once the old stuff is gone the fun begins.

Some re-finishing will be helpful. With such an open and easily accessible area, it’s the perfect time to do any needed sanding. Some will be tempted to paint or wallpaper at this stage. That’s an option but keep in mind that it really raises the bar on the need to be careful putting the new vanity in place.

Measure the height from the floor and distance from one wall of all pipes and hoses. We assume you considered those before buying a replacement to fit the space. So this step is to ensure that the replacement slides in to just the right place.

Part of that effort may involve cutting and/or drilling any needed holes in the back of the new vanity. Hot and cold water hoses have to snake through these in the under-the-sink section. Ditto the drain pipe(s) from the wall.

Now for a key task: make sure that everything is level.

Very few floors are perfectly level and even a custom-made vanity will not have had the base cut to compensate. The easiest way to deal with the problem is to shim around the base to prevent any wobble or excess pressure on one side. Then the remainder can be caulked to close up any gaps.

It’s theoretically possible to shave the base of the vanity instead, but the effort would rarely be worth the trouble. It is important to consider this before fitting your bathroom vanity units with sink.

Once that’s taken care of, the easy steps are all that’s left. Locate a couple of wall studs behind the vanity and under the countertop. Use them to provide a secure mounting area to fasten the nailer (a flat section of the vanity at the rear) to the wall. Pre-drill a couple of holes with a bit a little smaller than the wood screws. Then fasten.

Lay a bead of plumber’s putty around the rim of the vanity for the sink and lower the sink into place. It will squeeze out some of the putty, top and bottom. Scrape the excess from the top using a cuticle tool or ice cream stick, then wipe the remainder off with a slightly damp sponge before it dries.

We hope you have got some useful information about how to install a bathroom vanity units with sink from our Home Improvement Experts.

If you have any DIY tips you would like to share, visit our about us page and leave a comment.

Bathroom Extractor Fan Wiring

Bathroom Extractor Fan Wiring

Do you need advice for bathroom extractor fan wiring. Wiring a bathroom presents a few unique challenges. Not only do you run into unique appliances like vents and fans, but the grounding concerns are a critical safety element in bathroom wiring. Bathrooms are enclosed, usually smaller, and often put moisture into the entire air space of the bathroom. That makes wiring them for safety all the harder and more important.

Some electrical codes take these facts into account differently than others. But common sense and good wiring practice alone are enough to guide the do-it-yourselfer in this area. This is important to know when considering bathroom extractor fan wiring.

A vent and fan isn’t always legally required. But it very often makes the most sense. Windows, when they exist in a bathroom, often remain closed during showering, as does the entrance door. The build up of hot, moist air creates several potential problems.

Water itself is a decent insulator, contrary to popular belief. What makes it a good conductor – and therefore potentially dangerous around electricity – is the fact that it’s almost never pure. Minerals and salts that dissolve readily in water are everywhere in the bath. Sweat from feet and hands, calcium carbonate, iron oxide and more all turn water into a good conductor.

That means that plugging in a hair dryer, turning on an electrical heater and other common bathroom devices raise the risk of shock, unless outlets and devices are wired properly. When they are, the risk is no greater than it is in the kitchen or elsewhere that water and electricity are likely to mix.

GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) receptacles are one of the most common ways to deal with that problem in the case of outlets. They are designed to instantly cut off the juice whenever the current or voltage exceeds the design limit. They work. A 4-watt nightlight is plugged into an outlet that is incorrectly delivering 150 volts. Turn on the switch and, boom, the GFCI circuit trips. Press the center button to reset and it will blow again.

But there are more basic considerations.

Isolating devices onto separate circuits increases the margin of safety in the bathroom. Having an under-the-sink hot water device on a different circuit from the main light switch is one example. Wiring the electrical heater in the wall to a different circuit than the vent/fan is another. Having strip lights over the mirror on a separate circuit from the main ceiling light is yet a third.

When designing or re-doing the bathroom extractor fan wiring take into account the average loads of all expected devices. Install circuit breakers to match. In most cases 20-amp breakers are the usual choice. By designing safety features in depth, with redundancy, you provide that extra margin of safety. That can mean the difference between injury or fire and a relaxing time in the bathroom.

We hope you have got some useful information about bathroom extractor fan wiring from our Home Improvement Experts.

If you have any DIY tips you would like to share, visit our about us page and leave a comment.