DIY Bathroom Drain Repair

DIY Bathroom Drain Repair

Bathtub drains seem like they attract clogs. At some point you may require bathroom drain repair. And eventually you’ll find you will need to repair or replace one.

Bathroom drains tend to require maintenance or repair a little more often than those in the kitchen. The bath has no garbage disposal and the kitchen drain doesn’t get anywhere near as much hair. The sink drain is the most likely culprit. Hand soap, toothpaste, hair and other things tend to gum it up.

Bathtub Drain Repair – DIY Tips for Replacing Bathtub Drains

A mixture of a 1/4 cup of baking soda and a cup of vinegar is an inexpensive home remedy that will unclog many plugs. It has the added advantage of removing calcium carbonate (the white chalky deposits), which opens up the pipe and clears the space between the sink flange and the stopper. If that’s not strong enough, use a commercial drain opener chemical. They’re safe for the pipes and the environment. They degrade rapidly.

For more stubborn cases, just remove the U-shaped pipe under the sink (sometimes called a trap or trap bend). Ninety-percent of anything that fell down the drain or is gumming up the works will get trapped at the bottom of the ‘U’. Clear it out, apply Teflon plumber’s tape and replace the pipe. Be sure to wrap the tape in a direction that tightens it into the threads as you secure the nut, rather than unwinds it.

The bathtub drain represents a more difficult problem. Obviously so, since it’s harder to get at the hardware underneath the tub. They usually come with a screen to prevent problems, but as time goes on it often gets knocked out of the way or removed. Then hair, shampoo caps and a dozen other things end up in the drain.

A plumber’s snake (also called an ‘auger’) can help remove stubborn clogs. Some have small ‘fingers’ on the end that can be clamped together to retrieve a fallen object.

Many designs have a stopper that can be pushed down or pulled up to open or close the drain. This offers a solution to bathroom drain repair. They simply unscrew, giving some access to the drain. Others operate by a lever built in to the tub. Removing the overflow plate gives access to an assembly that can be removed. That will release the drain stopper.

In more extreme cases, it may be necessary to replace the drain. Below the stopper is a metal fitting (sometimes called a ‘drain basket’) with a pair of metal pieces in the shape of an X. A dumbbell wrench (sometimes called a ‘basket wrench’) is used to remove it.

If that doesn’t give enough access to remove anything inside, it will be necessary to remove a section of wall to get to the drain and overflow pipes. Consider having a professional do this. If you want to proceed, the replacement kits are not expensive, around £15.

Once you have access to the area, the assembly is relatively easy to remove with a standard pipe wrench or wide-jaw pliers to get loose the slip-joint nuts. Seat the new parts in place and adjust the rod to the correct length to open and close the stopper. Then use Teflon plumber’s tape on the pipes and plumber’s putty on the drain flange to seal the new parts properly.

We hope you have got some useful information about DIY  bathroom drain repair from our Home Improvement Experts.

If you have any DIY tips you would like to share, visit our about us page and leave a comment.

Budget decorating ideas for small bathrooms

Budget decorating ideas for small bathrooms

This article offers small bathroom colour ideas. Painting a bathroom brings with it special considerations. No other room in the house produces hot moist air in a small, enclosed space.

First and foremost, that affects the selection of paint. Water-resistant, temperature-durable high gloss is usually selected for a reason. It provides good coverage to ensure that the moisture stays on the bathroom interior side of the wall. Moisture that seeps through cracks or, worse, goes right through the wall will inevitably lead to mildew build up.

That leads to an important task that has to be carried out before any painting is done. Any cracks, gaps or other openings have to be sealed properly before laying down the first coat. In some cases that will mean a silicon caulk around the vanity where the wall meets any moulding. In others it’s just a matter of repairing any drywall splits or other damage.

Preparation is key to a good paint job. Apart from sealing cracks, sand any previous paint well. Slick, high-gloss paint is designed to shed anything that hits the surface. To get the best result, that surface needs to be roughened to remove the topmost layer, then smoothed to provide a good surface for re-painting.

Tips for Painting Bathrooms

Even prior to sanding, though, a good cleaning may be necessary. Greasy handprints from the kids, dirt swipes from a dog’s swishing tail and a host of other things can appear on a wall very quickly. Make sure they’re all gone before you get out the sandpaper. Ask an interior design expert for small bathroom colour ideas. They will match your existing furniture to your ideas.

Once you’ve done the initial preparation of the surface, in terms of both cleaning and sanding, make sure it’s ready to receive paint in one more way. Any surface blemishes may appear trivial in this raw state. But once they receive high-gloss paint they’ll be magnified many times. It takes more time to get things in shape before getting out the roller. But the final results will be well worth the effort.

There’s one more item to consider before beginning, and it involves going back to paint selection issues one more time. Colour. This isn’t as easy a choice as it might appear.

The basic colour scheme of the bathroom provides the background for all other decorating decisions. A cheery yellow will simply never go with Victorian bronze fixtures. A subtle beige is too subdued to integrate well with bright brass taps.

Beyond the background colour, there’s the issue of selecting any contrasting or highlighting paint. Stained moulding and fixtures represent one way to offset colours. But bathrooms today are rarely one continuous colour of paint. Vertical stripes on one wall, horizontal trim at the top of a wall and many other more complex designs turn a bathroom paint job into an art project.

Give careful thought to the overall final look desired and you can’t go wrong. Prepare well and execution will be easy. Now, paint!

We hope you have got some useful information about small bathroom colour ideas from our Home Improvement Experts.

If you have any DIY tips you would like to share, visit our about us page and leave a comment.

Bathroom Extractor Fan Wiring

Bathroom Extractor Fan Wiring

Do you need advice for bathroom extractor fan wiring. Wiring a bathroom presents a few unique challenges. Not only do you run into unique appliances like vents and fans, but the grounding concerns are a critical safety element in bathroom wiring. Bathrooms are enclosed, usually smaller, and often put moisture into the entire air space of the bathroom. That makes wiring them for safety all the harder and more important.

Some electrical codes take these facts into account differently than others. But common sense and good wiring practice alone are enough to guide the do-it-yourselfer in this area. This is important to know when considering bathroom extractor fan wiring.

A vent and fan isn’t always legally required. But it very often makes the most sense. Windows, when they exist in a bathroom, often remain closed during showering, as does the entrance door. The build up of hot, moist air creates several potential problems.

Water itself is a decent insulator, contrary to popular belief. What makes it a good conductor – and therefore potentially dangerous around electricity – is the fact that it’s almost never pure. Minerals and salts that dissolve readily in water are everywhere in the bath. Sweat from feet and hands, calcium carbonate, iron oxide and more all turn water into a good conductor.

That means that plugging in a hair dryer, turning on an electrical heater and other common bathroom devices raise the risk of shock, unless outlets and devices are wired properly. When they are, the risk is no greater than it is in the kitchen or elsewhere that water and electricity are likely to mix.

GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) receptacles are one of the most common ways to deal with that problem in the case of outlets. They are designed to instantly cut off the juice whenever the current or voltage exceeds the design limit. They work. A 4-watt nightlight is plugged into an outlet that is incorrectly delivering 150 volts. Turn on the switch and, boom, the GFCI circuit trips. Press the center button to reset and it will blow again.

But there are more basic considerations.

Isolating devices onto separate circuits increases the margin of safety in the bathroom. Having an under-the-sink hot water device on a different circuit from the main light switch is one example. Wiring the electrical heater in the wall to a different circuit than the vent/fan is another. Having strip lights over the mirror on a separate circuit from the main ceiling light is yet a third.

When designing or re-doing the bathroom extractor fan wiring take into account the average loads of all expected devices. Install circuit breakers to match. In most cases 20-amp breakers are the usual choice. By designing safety features in depth, with redundancy, you provide that extra margin of safety. That can mean the difference between injury or fire and a relaxing time in the bathroom.

We hope you have got some useful information about bathroom extractor fan wiring from our Home Improvement Experts.

If you have any DIY tips you would like to share, visit our about us page and leave a comment.