Bathroom Extractor Fan Wiring

Bathroom Extractor Fan Wiring

Do you need advice for bathroom extractor fan wiring. Wiring a bathroom presents a few unique challenges. Not only do you run into unique appliances like vents and fans, but the grounding concerns are a critical safety element in bathroom wiring. Bathrooms are enclosed, usually smaller, and often put moisture into the entire air space of the bathroom. That makes wiring them for safety all the harder and more important.

Some electrical codes take these facts into account differently than others. But common sense and good wiring practice alone are enough to guide the do-it-yourselfer in this area. This is important to know when considering bathroom extractor fan wiring.

A vent and fan isn’t always legally required. But it very often makes the most sense. Windows, when they exist in a bathroom, often remain closed during showering, as does the entrance door. The build up of hot, moist air creates several potential problems.

Water itself is a decent insulator, contrary to popular belief. What makes it a good conductor – and therefore potentially dangerous around electricity – is the fact that it’s almost never pure. Minerals and salts that dissolve readily in water are everywhere in the bath. Sweat from feet and hands, calcium carbonate, iron oxide and more all turn water into a good conductor.

That means that plugging in a hair dryer, turning on an electrical heater and other common bathroom devices raise the risk of shock, unless outlets and devices are wired properly. When they are, the risk is no greater than it is in the kitchen or elsewhere that water and electricity are likely to mix.

GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) receptacles are one of the most common ways to deal with that problem in the case of outlets. They are designed to instantly cut off the juice whenever the current or voltage exceeds the design limit. They work. A 4-watt nightlight is plugged into an outlet that is incorrectly delivering 150 volts. Turn on the switch and, boom, the GFCI circuit trips. Press the center button to reset and it will blow again.

But there are more basic considerations.

Isolating devices onto separate circuits increases the margin of safety in the bathroom. Having an under-the-sink hot water device on a different circuit from the main light switch is one example. Wiring the electrical heater in the wall to a different circuit than the vent/fan is another. Having strip lights over the mirror on a separate circuit from the main ceiling light is yet a third.

When designing or re-doing the bathroom extractor fan wiring take into account the average loads of all expected devices. Install circuit breakers to match. In most cases 20-amp breakers are the usual choice. By designing safety features in depth, with redundancy, you provide that extra margin of safety. That can mean the difference between injury or fire and a relaxing time in the bathroom.

We hope you have got some useful information about bathroom extractor fan wiring from our Home Improvement Experts.

If you have any DIY tips you would like to share, visit our about us page and leave a comment.

Plumbing Tips for Preventing Pipe Freeze

Plumbing Tips for Preventing Pipe Freeze

As winter approaches on chore to make sure we do is to take steps to avoid having your pipes freezing in the colder nights. Pipe freeze isn’t the only problem.

After all, copper pipes can get to temperatures far below the freezing point of water without cracking. But too often it is accompanied by an ice blockage inside the pipe. That can lead to a pressure build up that ultimately bursts the pipe. Not only do you lose the ability to get water from the faucet, but now have the larger problem of clean up and repair.

In many homes, the odds of a burst pipe in winter from low temperatures are very low. But others have exposed pipes in crawlspaces or elsewhere. It takes only a modest opening around the base of the house to let in winds that can chill pipes to sub-freezing temperatures.

Even without that exposure, temperatures below about 20F/-6.7C present higher odds of ice forming inside pipes that will plug them up. Fortunately, to prevent that is usually straightforward and typically very inexpensive.

One old-fashioned remedy to avoid pipe freeze still works well: opening up the faucets to a slow drip.

Running water is slightly less susceptible to freezing than still water. But the main effect comes from simply opening the valve. That allows air and water to move, reducing any pressure build-up in front of the ice blockage. That gives the pressure ’somewhere to go’… somewhere other than pressing out the sides of the pipe, i.e. causing a break.

But there’s another old-fashioned saying that’s useful here: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Preventing the pipes from getting too cold in the first place reduces the odds to near zero of having a break.

One way to accomplish that is to wrap them with low-cost insulating foam.

The foam itself supplies no heat. But it helps the pipes and water retain any heat they have. Water and pipes at, say 35F/1.7C, will tend not to go below freezing if they retain the heat present in the water and pipe before the temperatures outside dipped.

The foam comes in different forms. One popular style is a long, flat rectangle that curls into a cylinder. The cylinder formed is the circumference of the pipe. That makes it easy to wrap the pipe along its length and simple to cut the rectangle to the proper length and/or width.

If you want to prevent pipe freeze try this tip. It’s inexpensive, easy to install and easy to replace.

Another method is more costly and a little more difficult to install. But it has the advantage of protecting pipes no matter what the temperature. Foam will only retain heat up to a point. Some is always lost. Installing a heating system for the water pipes is as sure a thing as possible.

There are two basic types: wires or tape along the pipe, and a circulating system.

The first type is simply a wire or tape containing one that sits along the surface of the pipe. Electricity passes through it and heats the wire, which transfers heat to the pipe and the water inside. Costs vary, but if it’s properly installed the method is nearly foolproof.

The second type is a little more expensive, but uses existing facilities. Sometimes it’s already built into the home. In this technique, hot water from the water heater is pumped slowly through the pipes. Cold water is circulated back into the heater. The system operates automatically via an in-built thermostat and pump that is put in the water line.

It costs a little more to run, because the system heats and re-heats water that isn’t being used. But it is the surest way to prevent any ice blockage. Any ice that forms will be quickly melted by the warm water before it can become a problem.

We hope you have got some useful information about preventing pipe freeze from our Home Improvement Experts.

If you have any DIY tips you would like to share, visit our about us page and leave a comment.